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Audit Interview: Learn Journalists' Secrets

Audit Interview: Learn Journalists' Secrets

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Online Resources
Ask, and Ye Shall Receive, by Natalia Scriabina, Romayne Smith Fullerton, Joel Brinkley, and Kim Kierans
How to improve audit interviews by Natalia Scriabina, Romayne Smith Fullerton
Frequently Asked Questions
Test your Interviewing Skills
Participating in The Journalist Secrets training will provide you with objective and professional direction that will increase your performance as an auditor.
 
The Program consists of a series of lessons, interactive exercises, and quizzes.
 
We issue Certificates that are accepted by IRCA and RABQSA as evidence of continual professional development.
Self-Paced Regular price
WebBased $235.00
To survive and thrive in today’s world, it is not just what you know. Of course, auditors need to be extremely competent, but they also must possess excellent “soft” skills – be memorable, impressive, credible, genuine, trusted and liked. Auditors need to know how to break down barriers and establish common ground among diverse sets of people.
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Learning Objectives
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1. First impression
  You can never get a second chance to make the first impression. The “don’t make me think” rule initially established for user-friendly web-sites applies to any product or service including auditing. Customers “don't read web pages - they scan them. They don't figure out how things work – they muddle through". In the application of this idea to auditing, we have found that customers don’t always pay attention to what auditors say, but tend to form their responses based on first impressions and this in turn can lead to assumptions.
2. Building Rapport
  In this part of the training we are going to talk about the informal part of the auditing process. The interviewer needs to read verbal and non-verbal signals to understand what topics should be avoided, what topics can help to build connections, and what can develop strong common ground with the interviewee.
3. Listening
  Journalists say that “an interviewer is a person who listens for a living”. It is not only important to listen actively, but also to use active listening and observation to achieve established objectives This session results in a set of specific recommendations and a description of techniques to enhance your listening and observational skills.
4. Questioning
  Journalists say that “In an ideal interview your subject talks about 85 percent of the time and you, only 15 percent”. They also say that “Words are everything. They build trust, inspire and show direction. They can hurt and they can help. Words need to be picked over, weighed, combed through, and only used deliberately.” So, how do you use the 15 percent of your time during an interview (it is only nine minutes of a 60 minute interview) in the most effective way?
5. Flow of interview
  For some auditors it is a challenge to cover all items on the audit agenda within the specified time of the interview. It is especially challenging when the flow of conversation doesn’t support the audit goals and objectives. As an example, the auditee can provide replies that can be too detailed, too broad, or outside of the scope concerned. The goals of this session are to learn and practice techniques that help to find the right balance between following the agenda and following the flow of conversations, and to navigate the conversation toward established objectives.
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